Great Night At Work

Kate holding a boxer pup

My daughter, Kate, works at an Emergency Veterinary Clinic.  The Clinic is open when the regular veterinary offices are closed, overnight, weekends and holidays.  Most of the pets that come into the clinic are severely injured or seriously ill.

On this particular Saturday, a boxer had 5 puppies at home, had been laboring for a couple of hours and not making any progress, so her owners brought her and the puppies to the Emergency Clinic.  The Veterinarian took an x-ray and could see two puppies stuck, one in each uterine horn.

The staff members were not hopeful, usually puppies that have been stuck for a number of hours do not survive.  The Veterinarian started a cesarean section and pulled out, one, two and surprise three puppies.  Each puppy was handed to one of the staff members.  The puppies were rubbed and suctioned to stimulate their breathing.

Kate spent minutes rubbing and suctioning the puppy she was handed and rubbing some more and finally the puppy took a breath!

Happily the three puppies delivered by C-section all survived and after making sure they were latching on and nursing they were able to go home with their brothers, sisters, and lucky momma!

As you can see from the smile on Kate’s face – it was an awesome night at work!

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5 Reasons to Adopt a Shelter Pet

Ella the Snow DogMost of us know the month of October for being Breast Cancer Awareness Month – and how could we miss it, really, with all of the outpouring of pink everywhere you turn throughout the whole month? The support for the cause is just astonishing – so many millions of people take part in this monthly activity to raise awareness about the disease that kills so many women.

But did you know that October is also National Adopt A Shelter Dog Month? That’s right, the entire month of October is also dedicated to raising awareness about adopting pets rather than purchasing them. And if you’ve never adopted before, here are 5 reasons why you should consider participating in this wonderful one-month celebration!

Sad dogEvery Animal Deserves a Second Chance

When you walk into an animal shelter, you don’t know what each and every animal has been through until you ask a shelter worker, and many times, the story may surprise you.

Animals end up in shelters for a number of different reasons – whether they were abused by previous owners, found abandoned in the woods or on the street or just could not be taken care of properly by their previous owners. Whatever their reason for landing in a shelter, each one of them deserves a second chance in life, and you could be the one to give them exactly that by adopting them!

Plus, when you adopt one shelter pet, you’ll be saving two animals – the one that you adopt, and the one who you freed up a spot in the shelter for who needs to find a loving home, too.

USS Frank Cable Sailor plays with a kennel of puppies at the Guam Animals In Need animal shelterProceeds Benefit the Shelter, Too

Whatever fee you may have to pay to adopt your new furry friend, you’ll know that your money isn’t just helping you rescue your new best friend, but it’s also going directly back into helping the shelter, too.

Animal shelters are often busy and overcrowded and don’t have the money or resources to tend to each animal the way they need to be tended to. This is how so many shelter pets end up with the unfortunate fate of being euthanized – the shelter either runs out of space or runs out of resources. With a donation to the shelter at the time you adopt your new pet, you’ll know that the money is being used to help save other animals who need someone to give them their second chance.

Happy DogYour Pet is Likely to be Healthy

The great thing about animal shelters is that they care so much for the animals that come to them. Most animals are immediately given a medical evaluation at the time of their arrival to the shelter and are then cared for properly until their adoption.

Most pets that you adopt from a shelter will already be vaccinated, and should they require any special medications, they will likely be bundled in when you adopt, too. Plus, most are already spayed or neutered, which is one less cost you’ll have to worry about with your new pet.

Many shelters even go to the extent of listing the animal’s behavioral traits and making sure the potential step-parents know what to expect with the animal. This way, future owners will know exactly what they are getting into and if the particular pet they are hoping to adopt will really fit into their family.

feeling guilty?No Need to House Break

Although some puppies do end up in animal shelters and up for adoption, it’s more likely that you’ll find a more mature dog in a shelter than a baby one. But that’s OK, because the older the adopted pet is, the less house breaking effort you’ll need to put in!

Older dogs are often more calm and better trained than puppies, which can be a welcome change from a puppy for the right family. Plus, shelters offer a much more varied selection when it comes to available pets than any pet store would. You’ll find all sizes, shapes and breeds of dogs, and usually at about all ages. But remember – the older the pet you adopt, the more mature they will be!

Jason Edward's dog Duke lays on a big sloppy wet tongue kiss. Dog show in Morro Bay, 10 May 2009.  Best of Bay Pooch PageantYou’ll Have a New Best Friend

Shelter pets are surprisingly grateful when you take them away from the shelter and give them a warm and loving “forever” home. It’s almost like an animal instinct that they know they have been rescued and that they should be eternally grateful – they’ll shower you with kisses and affection like you’ve never seen in an animal before!

Owning a pet can be a truly rewarding experience that will benefit both you and your new pet. Make sure that as soon as you adopt, you apply the proper pet ID tags to your animal so you never lose them once you’ve already rescued them – you can check out Ketchum’s full line of cat tags and dog tags for the best quality products.

Celebrate Adopt A Shelter Dog Month and save a life!

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The Old Maple

 I started to brush hog the back pasture about two weeks ago and noticed the big, old maple that I had rescued from my uncle’s chain saw a few years ago had finally died. It was not the healthiest thing at the time, but I loved it’s shape and how it stood above all the other trees around it. Positioned on the East side of the pasture, the silhouette of it’s canopy was beautiful and majestic against an early morning sky.

 After eight to ten passes by the old tree with the brush hog, satisfied that I let the old tree finish out it’s life on it’s own, it was now time to harvest the firewood. As I rode back and forth past the tree I studied it on each pass trying to decide how best to deal with it. Part of it’s allure for me in the past, is now a potential lethal hazard. The once beautiful, bifurcated canopy could easily become a “widow maker”. To further complicate matters, an old stone wall was built around the base making good footing difficult if a hasty retreat should be necessary in the felling process. Unwittingly, I must have assigned the felling task to my automatic success mechanism because I spent a great deal of time over the next two weeks thinking about this conundrum. I even think I dreamt about it one night. 

This Saturday, as I was heading over to finish brush hogging the pasture, I was also eager to study that big maple and finalize my plan of action. As I approached the field I immediately started looking for the tree. I don’t see it… Must not be in view yet… No, it should be right there…. About this time I notice a swath cut in the lower lying tree line… The big old tree had fallen in the wind last weekend. Problem solved!

 

As a child I spent a great deal of time on my father’s heels. So much so, that at my father’s funeral, nearly 13 years ago, I introduced my younger brother (by 14 months), Eric, to a long time friend of my father and the conversation went something like this: Me: “This is my brother, Eric. Friend: “You’ve got a brother? Well, that’s news to me!” (Yup, we’ve had him for 34 years.) No matter where my father was going, I wanted to go with him…the shop, the firehouse, the wood lot, wherever. He was always doing something interesting. I am sure, at times, he got sick of having me in tow. At any rate, I am what I am today, largely because of my father!

 

 After my father’s death, every once in a while something would happen around the shop that would make me think that he was here helping me. For example, one winter I lost a lynch pin out in the snow. That spring when I thought of it, it was as if someone was tapping me on the shoulder and saying look down….sure enough there it was! Dad was helping. That brings me back to the tree. I can’t help but think that Dad took the tree down for me! To help me out and keep me safe! Whether that kind of stuff does or does not occur is truly unknown, but it is fun for me to see what adventure he will join me on next! “What are you going to do now, Dad?”

 

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Cucumbers and Customer Service

    

     My daughter, Kate, is living in a small town in northern New York State.  There are several Amish Farms in her community.  The other day she wanted a cucumber, so she hopped in her car and stopped at an Amish Farm Stand.  The gentleman told her they were out of cucumbers and to try the stand down the road.  

     At the next stand there were no cucumbers on display.  My daughter asked the young Amish girl if she had any cucumbers.  She said no, they were out and asked how many did she need.  Kate said she only wanted one.  The Amish girl asked what size did she need, just one for slicing?  Yes, that’s all Kate wanted.  So the girl said, “I’ll run over to the garden and get you one.”  She skipped across the road and came back with a freshly picked cucumber.  The total for the cucumber and a fresh bulb of garlic was 50 cents!  The young girl started to put the cucmber and garlic in a bag, my daughter said she didn’t need a bag , “well, it’s wet” was the reply.  She didn’t want Kate to get her car wet.

    The customer service provided by this young woman was amazing.  She was happy to make a special trip to get what her customer wanted, to smile and still charge the standard price.  How refreshing to be treated with such friendly service.  Of course, this is my daughter’s favorite Farm Stand and her “go to” spot for fresh produce. 

    I’m sure we all can learn a lesson from the Amish Farm Stand,  treat our customers with respect, meet or exceed their expectations and smile!  They’ll be back!

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Lilly

    

 Lilly is my little rescue dog.  Looking at her Today you would never know she had such a rough start.  Lilly was a little stray living on the streets and not doing well.

     Lilly was hit by a car and fortunately, for her, she was picked up by a volunteer with the SPCA.  The volunteer was taking the injured puppy to the local Veterinary Office to be euthanized.  Lilly had been hit in the face and suffered a broken nose, some road rash, and was very malnourished.  Even though she was in pain she was wagging her tail and giving kisses.  Her wagging tail saved her life!  The Veterinarian decided to give her a chance and sent this picture to me.

     I had lost my best friend Gracie, another rescue, a few months earlier and had said “no more dogs.”  It took me about 3 minutes to name the scrawnie puppy Lilly and adopt her!

     When I brought her home, she came in the house, stole our Rottie’s toy and jumped up on the couch! They’ve been great friends from the start.

    The Veterinarian thought she was about 4 months old, she was so painfully thin, just skin and bones, it turns out she was probably over six months old.  I started bringing her to work with me so I could feed her every couple of hours.  I’ve had Lilly for over a year now, she’s filled out and looking beautiful.  She still comes to work with me everyday,  she runs through the building, greeting everyone, and rolling over for a belly rub!  Her joyful, tail wagging “Good Morning” is a great way to start the day.

    Lilly has found her “Forever Home” and I’m sure glad it’s with me!

 

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What Information Should Be Put On A Pet ID Tag?

Here at Ketchum, we specialize in manufacturing high-quality identification tags for all kinds of purposes. From firefighter accountability tags to rabies tags, we think it’s important to craft durable, long-lasting ID tags that can often mean the difference between life and death for both animals and people.

When it comes to pet ID tags in particular, people are often confused about what information to include on the small tag that gets attached to the pet’s collar. We can help clear up the wonderment for you, so you’re not overloading your pet’s neck with multiple tags to get all of their necessary information on them.

Your Phone Number

The first thing that most people do when they find a lost dog is look around to see if there’s any piece of identification on it that lists a phone number. When it comes to pets, most people are very understanding of the fact that they are a member of a family somewhere that is probably frantically looking for them.

Your phone number should be easy to read and in large enough print that people will see it immediately. Always include your area code, as your dog may end up traveling farther than you think he ever could. After all, the goal is to get your pet home safely if he ever gets lost, so your phone number may very well be the most important piece of information on animal ID tags.

"JR"Your Name

Including your name on your pet’s tag will help someone who finds him make sure they reach the right person at the number listed when they decide to call it. If you aren’t comfortable with putting your first and last name on the tag, simply use your last name.

Listing your pet’s name on his ID tag can be a bit unsafe – while on the one hand, a lost dog may be comforted by the sound of its own name, even if it’s coming from someone else’s mouth, on the other hand, listing your pet’s name would make it that much easier for someone who finds your pet to steal it. Ultimately, including your pet’s name on his ID tag is your decision and there is no real set standard for it.

City and State

It’s a good idea to at least include your city and state location on your pet’s ID tag, rather than your whole address. You don’t want people to stop by with your dog, and most are likely to call first before doing so anyway, but including a city and state will notify whoever finds your pet just how far the animal has traveled and how much additional help it may or may not need beyond simply taking it in and calling the owner.

Medical Information

If your pet requires any special medical attention, it’s extremely important to include it on his ID tag. That way, if he runs away from home, whoever finds him will know to either take him to a vet or return him to his owner immediately.

Some pet owners even include the phrase “Needs Medication” or “Special Medical Needs” on their pet’s tags regardless of whether the animal actually has a health issue or not. Most people will know to call the owner or a veterinary office immediately if they find a dog or cat with this phrase on its tag. It’s an additional insurance that if your pet is found, you will likely be notified immediately.

While there is no real industry standard for the information that should be included on your pet ID tags, these simple things can mean the difference between your pet being returned to you or going missing forever. And don’t forget – pet ID tags aren’t just for dogs, we make cat tags, as well!

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Welcome to Our New Blog!

Hello, everyone!

Welcome to the brand new Ketchum Mfg. Co. Blog! We are excited to have a place now to post our thoughts, reactions, stories and general wonderments to share with all of you, our loyal customers and fans.

We’re also excited to be making a push with our social media this year – before you know it, you’ll see us on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ so that we can constantly interact with the most important people to us – YOU! It will give you the chance to get to know us, and us the chance to get to know you, as well.

Until we get everything up and fully running, be sure to check out our website and all of the products that we’ve always brought you, straight from our historic home in Upstate New York.

Thanks for stopping by – and stay tuned for more!

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