Color Coding Chickens

These free range hens are easy to tell apart and possibly all have names.  On a larger farm identification bands are helpful in keeping track of the flock.  Our poultry leg bands are available in a variety of colors to help track hatch dates and breeding pedigrees.

We also have customers that use these bands as tamper evident container seals and law enforcement agencies are using them as evidence tags.

Our 3 hole adjustable poultry leg band, catalog number 346, is available in plain aluminum, colored aluminum and brass.  The overall band is 3-1/4″ long, the three holes provide three sizes in one band.

The leg band material arrives is thin coils.  The colored aluminum is painted on both sides, we get a different color on each side, increasing the color choices available.  When we get an order, the requested metal coil is placed on a large turntable and the material is threaded into the press.

Our customers can have up to three lines of custom information stamped onto the leg bands.  The press operator selects the required pieces of metal type, which are very small, and sets them into the type holder.  The type holder is then securely bolted into the top of the press bed.  The automated number head is also mounted into the top of the press bed, the requested start number is selected.

The safety gate closes and the press is started.  The material goes through several station in the press, transforming coils of aluminum or brass into customized poultry identification bands.

  • The personalized information is stamped into the metal
  • The required serial number is embossed
  • The sealing button is drawn up
  • The holes are punched out
  • The band is trimmed to length

Our leg bands do require the use of our sealing plier, catalog number 347, to get a proper seal.

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Yikes! Spiders

The picture of the giraffe up a tree cracked me up!  I can definitely relate.  My whole family has a fear of or at least a  strong dislike of spiders.  I know it’s not rational, that humans are much bigger and smarter and can usually move faster, but spiders give me a chill down my spine.

When we were kids my sisters and I always called on our Dad to solve our spider problems.  We would yell to him and like our hero he would come to our rescue and kill the scary spider.  You know you can’t go to sleep with a spider in your room.  They watch you with those beady eyes and as soon as the light goes off they start slowly inching along on those hairy legs right toward you. 

When my daughters were young they developed a “bug alarm”, theirs was a lot more sensitive then mine, they hate spiders, bugs, ants, pretty much every creepy, crawly!  Unfortunately, as the Mom, I was the one that had to come to the rescue and kill the spiders.  I can tell you, my bravery was all an act to keep the girls calm, I was about in a sweat every time I had to kill a spider.  I usually need a shoe to squash them, no grabbing with a tissue for me.

My daughters are both adults and even now if they see a spider the “bug alarm” goes off and they yell for me.  I can tell by the panic in their voice why they are calling me, I give them a little grief and tell them to man up, but then I go kill the spider and I still hate it.

My sister has retained her fear of spiders.  She uses the vacuum cleaner, she can have the long extension on the vacuum hose and be nearly across the room to get the spider!

So like the giraffe, we’re keeping our distance from spiders!

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Great Night At Work

Kate holding a boxer pup

My daughter, Kate, works at an Emergency Veterinary Clinic.  The Clinic is open when the regular veterinary offices are closed, overnight, weekends and holidays.  Most of the pets that come into the clinic are severely injured or seriously ill.

On this particular Saturday, a boxer had 5 puppies at home, had been laboring for a couple of hours and not making any progress, so her owners brought her and the puppies to the Emergency Clinic.  The Veterinarian took an x-ray and could see two puppies stuck, one in each uterine horn.

The staff members were not hopeful, usually puppies that have been stuck for a number of hours do not survive.  The Veterinarian started a cesarean section and pulled out, one, two and surprise three puppies.  Each puppy was handed to one of the staff members.  The puppies were rubbed and suctioned to stimulate their breathing.

Kate spent minutes rubbing and suctioning the puppy she was handed and rubbing some more and finally the puppy took a breath!

Happily the three puppies delivered by C-section all survived and after making sure they were latching on and nursing they were able to go home with their brothers, sisters, and lucky momma!

As you can see from the smile on Kate’s face – it was an awesome night at work!

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5 Reasons to Adopt a Shelter Pet

Ella the Snow DogMost of us know the month of October for being Breast Cancer Awareness Month – and how could we miss it, really, with all of the outpouring of pink everywhere you turn throughout the whole month? The support for the cause is just astonishing – so many millions of people take part in this monthly activity to raise awareness about the disease that kills so many women.

But did you know that October is also National Adopt A Shelter Dog Month? That’s right, the entire month of October is also dedicated to raising awareness about adopting pets rather than purchasing them. And if you’ve never adopted before, here are 5 reasons why you should consider participating in this wonderful one-month celebration!

Sad dogEvery Animal Deserves a Second Chance

When you walk into an animal shelter, you don’t know what each and every animal has been through until you ask a shelter worker, and many times, the story may surprise you.

Animals end up in shelters for a number of different reasons – whether they were abused by previous owners, found abandoned in the woods or on the street or just could not be taken care of properly by their previous owners. Whatever their reason for landing in a shelter, each one of them deserves a second chance in life, and you could be the one to give them exactly that by adopting them!

Plus, when you adopt one shelter pet, you’ll be saving two animals – the one that you adopt, and the one who you freed up a spot in the shelter for who needs to find a loving home, too.

USS Frank Cable Sailor plays with a kennel of puppies at the Guam Animals In Need animal shelterProceeds Benefit the Shelter, Too

Whatever fee you may have to pay to adopt your new furry friend, you’ll know that your money isn’t just helping you rescue your new best friend, but it’s also going directly back into helping the shelter, too.

Animal shelters are often busy and overcrowded and don’t have the money or resources to tend to each animal the way they need to be tended to. This is how so many shelter pets end up with the unfortunate fate of being euthanized – the shelter either runs out of space or runs out of resources. With a donation to the shelter at the time you adopt your new pet, you’ll know that the money is being used to help save other animals who need someone to give them their second chance.

Happy DogYour Pet is Likely to be Healthy

The great thing about animal shelters is that they care so much for the animals that come to them. Most animals are immediately given a medical evaluation at the time of their arrival to the shelter and are then cared for properly until their adoption.

Most pets that you adopt from a shelter will already be vaccinated, and should they require any special medications, they will likely be bundled in when you adopt, too. Plus, most are already spayed or neutered, which is one less cost you’ll have to worry about with your new pet.

Many shelters even go to the extent of listing the animal’s behavioral traits and making sure the potential step-parents know what to expect with the animal. This way, future owners will know exactly what they are getting into and if the particular pet they are hoping to adopt will really fit into their family.

feeling guilty?No Need to House Break

Although some puppies do end up in animal shelters and up for adoption, it’s more likely that you’ll find a more mature dog in a shelter than a baby one. But that’s OK, because the older the adopted pet is, the less house breaking effort you’ll need to put in!

Older dogs are often more calm and better trained than puppies, which can be a welcome change from a puppy for the right family. Plus, shelters offer a much more varied selection when it comes to available pets than any pet store would. You’ll find all sizes, shapes and breeds of dogs, and usually at about all ages. But remember – the older the pet you adopt, the more mature they will be!

Jason Edward's dog Duke lays on a big sloppy wet tongue kiss. Dog show in Morro Bay, 10 May 2009.  Best of Bay Pooch PageantYou’ll Have a New Best Friend

Shelter pets are surprisingly grateful when you take them away from the shelter and give them a warm and loving “forever” home. It’s almost like an animal instinct that they know they have been rescued and that they should be eternally grateful – they’ll shower you with kisses and affection like you’ve never seen in an animal before!

Owning a pet can be a truly rewarding experience that will benefit both you and your new pet. Make sure that as soon as you adopt, you apply the proper pet ID tags to your animal so you never lose them once you’ve already rescued them – you can check out Ketchum’s full line of cat tags and dog tags for the best quality products.

Celebrate Adopt A Shelter Dog Month and save a life!

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The Old Maple

 I started to brush hog the back pasture about two weeks ago and noticed the big, old maple that I had rescued from my uncle’s chain saw a few years ago had finally died. It was not the healthiest thing at the time, but I loved it’s shape and how it stood above all the other trees around it. Positioned on the East side of the pasture, the silhouette of it’s canopy was beautiful and majestic against an early morning sky.

 After eight to ten passes by the old tree with the brush hog, satisfied that I let the old tree finish out it’s life on it’s own, it was now time to harvest the firewood. As I rode back and forth past the tree I studied it on each pass trying to decide how best to deal with it. Part of it’s allure for me in the past, is now a potential lethal hazard. The once beautiful, bifurcated canopy could easily become a “widow maker”. To further complicate matters, an old stone wall was built around the base making good footing difficult if a hasty retreat should be necessary in the felling process. Unwittingly, I must have assigned the felling task to my automatic success mechanism because I spent a great deal of time over the next two weeks thinking about this conundrum. I even think I dreamt about it one night. 

This Saturday, as I was heading over to finish brush hogging the pasture, I was also eager to study that big maple and finalize my plan of action. As I approached the field I immediately started looking for the tree. I don’t see it… Must not be in view yet… No, it should be right there…. About this time I notice a swath cut in the lower lying tree line… The big old tree had fallen in the wind last weekend. Problem solved!

 

As a child I spent a great deal of time on my father’s heels. So much so, that at my father’s funeral, nearly 13 years ago, I introduced my younger brother (by 14 months), Eric, to a long time friend of my father and the conversation went something like this: Me: “This is my brother, Eric. Friend: “You’ve got a brother? Well, that’s news to me!” (Yup, we’ve had him for 34 years.) No matter where my father was going, I wanted to go with him…the shop, the firehouse, the wood lot, wherever. He was always doing something interesting. I am sure, at times, he got sick of having me in tow. At any rate, I am what I am today, largely because of my father!

 

 After my father’s death, every once in a while something would happen around the shop that would make me think that he was here helping me. For example, one winter I lost a lynch pin out in the snow. That spring when I thought of it, it was as if someone was tapping me on the shoulder and saying look down….sure enough there it was! Dad was helping. That brings me back to the tree. I can’t help but think that Dad took the tree down for me! To help me out and keep me safe! Whether that kind of stuff does or does not occur is truly unknown, but it is fun for me to see what adventure he will join me on next! “What are you going to do now, Dad?”

 

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