Why You Need a Dog License Tag

Dog Running with Pet ID Tag

Exuberant greetings, constant companionship, unconditional love, and Instagram-worthy capers are the daily perks of being a dog owner. While this drama-free, happily-ever-after fairytale requires minimal exertion on our part, there are pertinent matters—like getting a dog license—that mandate our attention.

Obtaining a dog license is a prudent and necessary measure to ensure your loyal companion’s safe return in the event your pet goes missing. Imagine Mischief, your spunky German Shepard puppy-in-training, disappearing in the woods, entranced by some mysterious scent. Or coming home one evening and not seeing Sasha, your Terrier with a penchant for chasing plump squirrels in the backyard, leaping with joy at the door.

Your first instinct would be to lean out your house door and call for your pooch by name. If that doesn’t work, you might hop in your car and drive around the neighborhood for hours looking for them. After that, your last hope is that someone else finds your dog; and in that instance, a pet ID tag is your best chance of being reunited with Mischief or Sasha.
Continue reading “Why You Need a Dog License Tag”

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Rabies Facts, Prevention, and Treatment [Infographic]

Rabies serum with hypodermic

As Ketchum Mfg. Co. gears up for production of our 2021 edition rabies tags (see 10% off sale info below), we present our readers and followers with these important “rabies facts”:


(Click on the image to download a printable PDF of the infographic.)

Rabies Facts

Prevention and Treatment

Just follow these few simple rules:

  • Teach children never to approach or handle unfamilar animals, wild or domestic.
  • Make sure rabies vaccinations are up-to-date for all pet dogs and cats.
  • Responsibly supervise dogs, and keep cats indoors.
  • If you see stray animals, call your local animal control to remove them.
  • Ensure that bats are not able to enter occupied spaces.
  • If a bite from or exposure to a bat occurs and you are able to safely capture the animal, call your local animal control to have it tested for rabies.
  • Wash bite or scratch wounds from an animal with soap and water ASAP, and seek medical attention immediately.

Brass 2021 rabies tag

2021 Rabies Tag Sale

Order 2021 rabies tags from our website and save 10%! (Discount will appear in the shopping basket.)

Offer valid through July 31st.

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Do I Have To Get My Dog Or Cat A Rabies Vaccine?

2021 Rabies Tags

Both dogs and cats, as well as ferrets, are required to have a rabies vaccination in New York State, and the veterinarian who administers the shot will give you a Rabies Tag as proof of inoculation. If you’re not a New York resident, you can find more information about your state here: Rabies Aware. You can get a rabies shot medical exemption for your dog or cat if a licensed veterinarian determines that the vaccination will adversely affect your pet’s health. If getting a rabies vaccination is a concern for you, best have a conversation with your veterinarian.

In addition, if you live in New York, you must obtain a license for your dog once it reaches the age of four months. How often that license needs to be renewed – every one, two or three years – is the option of your local government. Fees vary by county and some counties have a significantly lower fee if your dog is neutered or spayed. Cats and ferrets do not need to be licensed. And ferrets may present another issue depending upon where you reside. Continue reading “Do I Have To Get My Dog Or Cat A Rabies Vaccine?”

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Five Summer Pet Safety Tips [Infographic]

Dog and cat cuddling on leaves

Summertime, and the livin’ is easy
Fish are jumpin’ and the cotton is high

— George Gershwin / DuBose Heyward


The myriad pleasures of summer are perfectly encapsulated in the song “Summertime” made famous by Ella Fitzgerald and others. It is traditionally a time to frolic outdoors and be carefree. But for summer-loving humans, it comes with its own set of risks and dangers as well, from sunburn and poison ivy to pesky mosquitoes and under-barbecued burgers.

The same applies to our beloved pets. While dogs and cats love to explore outside when the weather turns warm, it is important to remember there are hidden perils in even the most serene and halcyonic settings that can put their health and very lives at risk.

This infographic will serve as a reminder to pet owners to stay alert to those perils. Continue reading “Five Summer Pet Safety Tips [Infographic]”

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Book Review: Rabid—A Cultural History

Rabid dog

By Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy

The full subtitle of this book neatly encapsulates its theme and tone: A Cultural History of the World’s Most Diabolical Virus. Note that it identifies itself not as a general or scientific history, but as a “cultural” one. This is an accurate descriptive; for truly, few diseases known to humanity have branded themselves into our collective psyche and culture so widely, so deeply, and for so long; and as something not merely organically deadly but infernally so, and thus profoundly to be feared. (The few others that even come close include leprosy and polio.)

Though shelved in the non-fiction area of your library or bookstore, Rabid spins a series of tales and observations that could have come from the fictional horror story pen of Stephen King. It is at once fascinating and terrifying. The authors, a husband-and-wife team, are eminently qualified to write such a book. Wasik is a magazine editor who writes about science and technology; while Murphy is a veterinarian with a degree in public health. Together they have put together the definitive “biography” of the rabies pathogen. Continue reading “Book Review: Rabid—A Cultural History

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