The History of The Easter Bunny

easter bunny

Easter Sunday was originally created as a way for the Christian community to come together and celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ. However, as modern views continue to chime in and grow in popularity, the celebration of Easter has been altered. A fictional character known as the Easter Bunny has been used to brand the holiday. Now, what’s even more interesting is that the symbol of the rabbit has no ties to the Christian community. So, where did it come from?

Easter aka Eostra

Well, Pre-Christian Germany dates back to the 13th century. During this time, people worshiped several gods and goddesses. One goddess, in particular, is responsible for the branding of the Easter Bunny. Her name was named Eostra. She was the goddess of spring and fertility.

Add Rabbit, Bunny, Hare.

Ancient History has branded this animal as a symbol of fertility. These rambunctious little guys are known for their high level of energy, small bodies, and  perky set of ears.

Meet the Easter Bunny

Originally named Osterhase, this hare was brought to American when the German settlers started to migrate here. The concept behind Osterhase was to reward children for being well behaved. In exchange, they would receive bright colored eggs filled with chocolates and candies. As years continued to pass, people started to catch on and add their own personal twists. The holiday has turned into a family affair to include a big Easter dinner and an interactive egg hunt.

Spring, in general, marks a time of blossom. It’s also a pretty happy time of year.
The snow is melting, people and animals are coming out of hibernation, and we are blessed with the cuteness of newly born livestock. Keep your eye out for these furry little creatures as the continue to pop up around farms nationwide.
baby farm animals

Lisa Podwirny is the owner of Ketchum Mfg. Connect with her on Google+

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