Ten Reasons NOT to Get a Puppy This Holiday Season

Christmas Puppy

Today is Black Friday. With Thanksgiving over, many American families turn their thoughts to the next big celebration of the season: Christmas. And often, this is the time of year we think about buying a puppy to join the household.

As any dog-owner knows, our canine friends are highly intelligent (some would say “sentient”) creatures, with a surprisingly sophisticated emotional and behavioral life. For that reason, you should think long and hard before buying a puppy for the family this holiday season. Here are ten reasons why: Continue reading

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Autumn Pet Safety Tips

Autumn Scene

The last of the summer’s harvest is being gathered in, the kids have returned to their classrooms (oh joy!), and already the leaves in some places are starting to turn. That can mean only one thing: fall has arrived!

September 22 marks the autumnal equinox, when the hours of daylight and dark are equal. With this shift in seasons, we should also shift our thinking and habits regarding our beloved dogs and cats. Here are a few ideas, apropos for this time of year, to keep your pets safe and happy.

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The History of Animal ID Tags

Dog with tags
We all know what a dog tag is for. If your dog ever loses its way, there’s that little piece of metal is there to save the day. And if you ever visit a farm, you’ll notice that cattle have a small tag on their ear. Most people don’t give this tag a second thought. What’s the real significance of these animal tags? Why did we start using them? Read below for a quick history on this system.

Dog Tags

The famous jingling sound coming from a dog’s neck has been around for a very long time, and it has a fascinating history. Most dogs used to have just their name written on the tag. Over time, people avoided putting their dog’s name on the tag. One reasons was that it became easy for a thief to steal a dog simply by calling it over. And when dogs were stolen, the thief wouldn’t have to give authorities much proof it was theirs – they would simply say the dog’s name and the dog would respond, which was proof enough that the thief was the “owner.”

To avoid these highly illegal and truly sad acts from happening, people started putting different info, such as a phone number or an address, on the tag. In the last half-decade or so, you could even put a QR code on an ID tag. Or use an ID tag with a microchip installed. As helpful as all of that can be, putting your dog’s name on a tag has its advantages. One popular advantage is that when a lost dog is found, the finder can use the dog’s name to comfort it.
Stanley Iwanski's WWII Dogtag (1942)
Ever since the early days of information getting put on identification tags, the army started using what were basically real “dog tags” as a way to identify anyone in the military. These tags became very popular in World War II. Still today, soldiers wear dog tags. If a soldier is wounded in battle, they can be identified. Back before dog tags were used, soldiers would identify themselves in any way possible – even if it meant putting paper notes on their coats.

Cattle Tags

Cattle
Cattle tags have been around since farmers started to need a way to distinguish their cattle in a herd. Branding used to be the most popular way to do it, and it’s still sometimes the method of choice today. For humane and economic reasons, America has adopted a method of using livestock ear tags. What gets put on the tag differs. It could be as simple as a two to four digit number that makes the sales process easier. Sometimes your auction name can be customized on the back. Or if the cattle is already at home on a farm, the tag could include its gender, date of birth, and its parents. Ankle tags and neck tags are also used on cows, while poultry commonly have leg and wing bands.

Lisa Podwirny is the owner of Ketchum Mfg. Connect with her on !

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How ID Tags Can Save a Pet’s Life

LostOne of the best items we can purchase for our pets is an identification tag. Let’s face it, accidents happen. If your pet wonders out of sight, pet ID tags can help to ensure their safe return. Even an up-to-date rabies tag on your pet will help in the returning process. Just be sure to register your pet with a veterinarian.

An ID tag is like your pet’s get-out-of-jail-free card, if ever it were to be picked up by up by Animal Control. According to The Humane Society of the U.S., pet owners reclaim 30 percent of shelter dogs each year. More shockingly, only two to five percent of cats are reclaimed yearly. While the vast majority of these stray animals have no identification, those who do often get to return home before heading to the shelter.

What should be on the tag?

At the very minimum, your phone number should be on the pet’s ID tag. This will provide the rescuer with a means to contact you. In our technologically advanced world, you may want to use your cell phone number, as you’ll likely be out looking for your pet and you’ll only be reachable by cell. Another piece of information you will want to include on your pet’s ID tag is your address. This way, if your pet were only to wander down the block, it will be more apt to be returned immediately.

Tags are cheap and accessible

Do not put your pet’s life at risk, purchase ID tags. They are super cheap and easily accessible. You can order them online or pick them up at your local veterinarian. At Ketchum, we specialize in pet identification tags. We produce all of our tags in your choice of materials, including aluminum, brass and stainless steel. We also offer a variety of shapes and sizes to match every pet identification need. More importantly, our tags are Taro models his new custom black twill collar from kninecouture.comcreated with your pet in mind. They are built to last and perfect for hanging on your pet’s collar, no matter where he or she might go.

Pet ID tags save lives; it’s as simple as that. While our country has come a long over the years increasing pet ownership and decreasing euthanasia, there are still an estimated 2.7 million healthy shelter pets not adopted each year. And with a good percentage of these pets strays, it’s more important than ever to use animal identification.

Lisa Podwirny is the owner of Ketchum Mfg. Connect with her on !

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